Monday, October 28, 2013

Activist Male Judge Overturns Female Approved Texas Abortion Law, Dealing Blow to Women's Rights


"Glaring proof that American men are allowed to make decisions regarding a woman's body and her choices."

SAN NARCISO, Calif. (Bennington Vale Evening Transcript) -- "Power mad" was one of the pejorative phrases used by female voters in Texas to describe District Judge Lee Yeakel's ruling to strike down limits on abortion after state lawmakers passed them during a legislative session this summer. Yeakel declared two key provisions to the health and safety code unconstitutional for restricting women's access to pregnancy termination clinics and undermining doctors' rights to treat patients according to their best medical interests. Janis Lane, the outspoken leader of the Central Mississippi Tea Party, attacked the ruling for considering only a patient's medical interests, not her moral interests. State Representative Jodie Laubenberg and Senator Donna Campbell -- two female lawmakers in Texas who helped drive the pro-life bill that passed by 62 percent, including a majority of Texas women -- called Yeakel's decision a "huge setback for women's rights" and "glaring proof that American men are allowed to make decisions regarding a woman's body and her choices."

Despite all the media attention paid to State Sen. Wendy Davis, the Democrat who made a mockery of female voters with her 13-hour filibuster against the prohibitive abortion bill, which women in the Lone Star State praised as monumental reform, very little focus was placed on Campbell and Laubenberg for leading the charge to pass HB-2 in the legislature's upper chambers.

Because of their efforts, Gov. Rick Perry signed HB-2 into law this July. On Monday, however, one activist judge undid this significant conservative victory for women in Texas. Yeakel's "crazed and chauvinistic" actions not only impinged on the cherished concept of state's rights but demonstrated a male-centric disregard for the health and well-being of women across the nation, according to Sen. Campbell, a double-board certified physician who understands the dangers posed by liberal policies of "fast and loose abortions" in a culture now accepting of federally sanctioned death panels.

Campbell, a woman herself, and whose friend of a friend's sister's cousin's roommate once attended Lilith Fair, says she is close to the pulse of women's rights in her state.

Janis Lane, perhaps the most powerful and influential female voice in the Tea Party, supported Campbell and Laubenberg by deriding Wendy Davis' alacrity and aggression in opposing the will of Texas women. Lane pointed out that Davis is most likely a lesbian, "basically a penis-less man who has no cause to tell real ladies what to do with their bodies. Texas women fought for this bill, Texas women voted for this bill. Texas women want their elected officials to uphold their beliefs. What they don't want are renegade judges, out-of-touch men and attention-starved lesbians making their decisions for them."

Lane previously helped a brave faction of conservative women emerge from the shadows to voice their support for the Tea Party's doctrine against female suffrage. She encouraged like-minded followers to convince others that women shouldn't be allowed to vote. And to the relief of conservative men who patiently but tirelessly struggled to restore the grace of God on America's morally bankrupt political system, Tea Party females across the country carried Lane's courageous message of self-loathing to the public.

"There is nothing worse than a bunch of mean, hateful women," she said at the time. "They are diabolical in how they can skewer a person. I do not see that in men."

The grandstanding tactics of Wendy Davis in June underscored Lane's point, further illustrating that much more work lies ahead.

"Seeing Wendy Davis rise to prominence and glory over the past few months, it's obvious I haven't done enough," Lane admitted. "We're hoping to redouble our efforts, and Wendy Davis' villainous public image should serve as a strong reminder of our message."

2013. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License. See disclaimers.
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