Monday, July 23, 2012

Conservatives Admit More Gun Law Education is Needed in Wake of Colorado Theater Shootings

SAN NARCISO, Calif. (Bennington Vale Evening Transcript) -- Shortly after midnight on Friday, July 20, a gunman wearing black SWAT gear and a gas mask entered an Aurora, Colo., theater during the premiere of "The Dark Knight Rises," ignited a gas canister, and opened fire on unsuspecting moviegoers. James Holmes, the 24-year-old assailant, killed 12 people and seriously wounded at least 60 more. This was the deadliest shooting incident in Colorado since the 1999 Columbine High School massacre, government officials pointed out. And as is customary in the aftermath of America's mass shootings, they also hinted at a national discussion about guns and gun safety, even though such discussions rarely take place. On Monday, however, conservative Republicans who staunchly support the NRA and Second Amendment remedies admitted that more needs to be done to educate citizens on existing gun laws. Leading the charge was Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Texas) who publicly pondered, "With all those people in the theater, was there nobody that was carrying a gun that could have stopped this guy more quickly?"

Colorado state law allows for citizens to carry concealed weapons. Had someone in the theater been armed, Gohmert suggested, the tragedy may have been mitigated and Holmes taken out before significant loss of life followed.

"Gun control laws don't work," Gohmert declared at a Heritage Foundation function. "The United States has gun control laws, and The Brady Campaign's list of mass shootings is 62 pages long. That's just since 2005, folks. Clearly the nanny state has failed its wards. In fact, it's shaken the babies."

Of greater concern to Gohmert and his colleagues, however, are states with liberal weapons carrying policies but no public awareness of such rights.

"Florida is a great example of a state that got its message out loud and clear," Gohmert continued. "But Colorado's obviously failed to transfer this knowledge to its people, otherwise folks in the cinema would've taken care of business before that nutjob passed the concessions stand. I'm not one to agree with Democrats, but I will on this point: a lot more needs to be done to educate people on gun laws."

Gohmert has volunteered to create a task force responsible for developing programs to teach gun carrying and ownership practices in states such as Colorado and Arizona. He has also proposed that students between the ages of 11 and 18 in those states attend mandatory firearms classes. Additional federal funds will be allocated to assist with the construction of on-campus shooting ranges. Congressional insiders expect the bill to pass the House by party majority.

(c) 2012. See disclaimers.